Sunderland Museum And Winter Gardens

To begin with, the first Sunderland museum was in the Athenaeum in Fawcett Street in 1846. Indeed, Sunderland was the first place outside of London to have a publicly funded museum. In addition, by 1858, a new public library was up and running alongside. However, by the 1870’s, more space… Continue reading

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Chester-le-Street

To begin with, Chester-le-Street is the business, residential and shopping centre of one of the smallest English districts. Indeed, the town is in the northern part of County Durham, between Durham City and Gateshead. Of course, Chester-le-Street stands on the River Wear and lies just 10 miles west of Sunderland.… Continue reading

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Hylton Castle

Hylton Castle Furthermore, it is easy to find as there is a large housing estate adjacent, aptly catted Hylton Castle Estate. To begin with, the original castle was a wooden construction from a time just after the Norman Conquest in 1066. The building was for an influential family with the… Continue reading

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Monkwearmouth Station

Monkwearmouth Station In essence, this combination was always going to be a railway station showpiece for Victorian Britain. Indeed, Monkwearmouth Station opened in 1848 and was one of the main railway lines in Sunderland. In fact, it was the main railway station in Sunderland at one point. Thomas Moore Thomas… Continue reading

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Bishopwearmouth

Bishopwearmouth To begin with, Bishopwearmouth is an area in Sunderland, North East England, covering around 20 square miles. Of course, this encompasses settlements such as Ryhope, Silksworth and the original Sunderland. In fact, this was one of the three areas that merged together to form the beginning of modern Sunderland.… Continue reading

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Ryhope Village

Ryhope Village To begin with, Ryhope is a coastal village along the southern boundary of the City of Sunderland, England. As a matter of fact, it is almost mid-way between the City Centre and Seaham. The village indeed has a long farming history going back well over 1,000 years. Moreover,… Continue reading

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Marsden Grotto

The Marsden Grotto Of course, the Marsden Grotto Pub is approximately three miles south of the entrance to the River Tyne. It is also around 6 miles north of Sunderland. Just to clarify, the pub is built into the cliff face at Marsden Bay. Incidentally, Marsden Bay is ran by… Continue reading

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Houghton-le-Spring

Houghton-le-Spring Moreover, at the same time, Hetton-le-Hole and Washington Urban Districts became part of Sunderland. In essence, this was to form a new borough within the Tyne and Wear Metropolitan County. Naming Of Houghton In the Boldon Book of 1183, the name of the town was Hoctona, but at other… Continue reading

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Washington New Town

Welcome To The Original Washington In modern English, Hwæsa becomes Wassa or Wossa after translation, so this could refer to an influential chieftain or farmer. Moreover, there is an actual reference to Wassyngtona meaning ‘settlement of Wassa’s people’. Because there are no records from this period, evidence is hard to… Continue reading

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Monkwearmouth

Monkwearmouth Firstly, Monkwearmouth is an area of Sunderland on the north side of the River Wear. It all began at the end of the seventh century because of a young nobleman named Benedict Biscop. To clarify, Biscop is the Patron Saint of Sunderland and was born in AD627 at the Royal… Continue reading

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